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Author Topic: Making a Murderer  (Read 434 times)

Mark

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Making a Murderer
« on: January 27, 2016, 06:50:06 PM »
If you don't have Netflix, you might not be aware of this documentary series.  It follows the trials of a man that was sentenced to 18 years in prison and then exonerated due to DNA evidence proving his innocence.  Then, not even two years later, with a windfall of money on the horizon from his civil lawsuit, gets implicated in a murder investigation and is once again sent to jail.  This is where the most interesting aspect of the series happens as you see the State defend itself against a very talented duo of lawyers that are trying to prove that he was framed by the police.

I'm not going to spoiler this, but I will say that it is one of the most interesting documentaries I've ever seen in my life.  I got emotionally invested and went from a casual look to "I gotta keep watching and see what happens".  It is amazingly compelling.

For me, what bothers me the most is that indeed there are people in power out there that can pretty much ruin your life if you pissed them off or they just don't like you.

I remember one time I got a parking ticket in the mail from CSUN University.  It was mailed to me with all of my information and it said that if I didn't pay I would be subject to ever increasing penalties, have my registration on my car put on hold, and my license revoked.  And this was especially disturbing because I have never been to CSUN in my life.  So I called and called and nobody was interested in the fact that I had never been there.  Finally I wrote out a long letter and mailed it over.  A couple months and many nervous nights later, I get a response that the ticket has been removed and I no longer have to pay the penalty.

While I'm glad things finally worked out, I find it kind of crazy that my life could have completely been turned around by what I'm guessing was a simple mistake (probably the person doing data entry transposed some digits or something).  What if the person in charge here was afraid to fess up to his mistake or was someone with a grudge against me?  How would I defend myself?

 




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